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ADVISOR FOCUS - a newsletter from globeadvisor.com
18 Nov 2004

Current Issue | Subscribe to Advisor Focus | Back Issues


SPOTLIGHT: Millions in Restitution

Big Mutual Funds Agree to Costly Restitution
Four big mutual-fund companies have agreed to pay about $200-million in restitution for questionable trading practices in what will be an unprecedented settlement with securities regulators, sources say. Karen Howlett has the inside story.

Safety the Key for Fund Investors in October
Safe-haven investing in income, dividend and balanced funds continue to dominate the mutual fund landscape. According to IFIC's October industry sales figures, investors poured $703.4-million into dividend and income funds. Keith Damsell looks at the implications.


PENSIONS AND TRUSTS: Pension Threats, Abandoned Plans

  • Pensions Threaten Future Profits, Directors Fear
    Canadian board members are concerned that their companies' traditional pension plans will be a significant drag on earnings, with many saying the solution is to reduce costs or terminate the plans, a new survey has found. Janet McFarland investigates.

Plus: Pension Funds Get the Cold Shoulder from Money Managers

  • Lacking Clarity from Ottawa, CI Fund Abandons Trust Idea
    CI Fund Management Inc. has ruled out turning the fund company into an income trust, citing legislative uncertainty. ''We would never go down that road unless it was crystal clear what the position of the federal government has on this, and they aren't even close,'' says CEO Bill Holland. Read Keith Damsell's report.
     
  • With Trusts, Just Focus on the Business
    Ever since Canadian investment bankers started cranking out business trusts for individual investors looking for yield, a line in the sand has been drawn between those who felt these inventions were just what the public needed and those that concluded the opposite. Martin Braun looks at both sides.

PERSONAL INVESTING: Scraping By, Bond Conversion

  • Savings Strategy Couple's Biggest Retirement Issue
    A couple we'll call Vivian and Susan have a good life in British Columbia. Their home is far from the urban rat race, but their village offers few ways to make money. The result is their combined incomes, about $45,000, barely cover expenses. Andrew Allentuck explores their options.
     
  • New Exchange-Traded Fund Brings You the Whole Bond Universe
    It looks like there's a nice little holiday season present on the way to index investors. Barclays Canada, the company behind the iUnits series of Canadian ETFs, announced yesterday that it wants to convert its 10-year government bond ETF into a new product that tracks the Scotia Capital Universe Bond Index. Rob Carrick has the details.

THE BIG PICTURE: Looking Forward, Making Deals

  • Here's a Look at Longer-Term Factors that Affect Growth
    How does an economy grow? The usual answer to that question revolves around growth in exports and in domestic spending by consumers, companies and governments. A different kind of answer -- and one that has become popular among economists around the world -- centres on longer-term factors. Bruce Little brings us the big picture.
     
  • Relationships Key for Successful Deal Makers space
    spaceIn the not-too-distant past, brokerage houses were run on relationships. Top investment bankers were always at the side of corporate chief executive officers, advising on every strategic move, and being handsomely compensated for their wisdom.  Andrew Willis asks what's changed.